This link and its contents are Strictly Private and Confidential, Copyright 2019, AnyOneCanRead (TM), All Rights Reserved. Please do not forward this link without our prior permission.   
   
Theoretically, the AnyOneCanRead (TM) proprietary analytics could build any phonics scope-and-sequence inside of any curriculum. Let’s observe how this could work with an early-grade passage from the Core Knowledge curriculum.
   
Here are your simple instructions. Turn on your speakers. Click green speaker buttons at the BEGINNINGS of passages. The passage will be read TO you until you encounter a red word. The student clicks through the red word until s/he hears the sound-out, and then hears the word spoken. (Speakers at the END of passages are there only for understanding confirmation and pronunciation reinforcement, especially for ESL learners. They enable the passage to be read to you withOUT stopping at the red words.)
   
Red words are strategically chosen to expose students’ brains to the decoding / sound-out “break apart, then blend back together” process that is necessary to eventually turn each new word from an unrecognized word into a permanently-mapped, instantaneous “reflex” word — for life! We will describe the letter-sound match that we are demonstrating in each example below. This could be built into any content, and scaffolded in any “exposure order” desired. There is no other technology in the world that can make all of this happen. And it eliminates the ineffective “offline rules” that are as often “exceptions” — and that bog down the sounding-out process — by removing the student’s mind from the far superior online, in-the-flow-of-reading environment of AnyOneCanRead (TM).
   
This work is based on an original work of the Core Knowledge ® Foundation made available through licensing under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. This does not in any way imply that the Core Knowledge Foundation endorses this work. With the understanding that for reuse or distribution, you must make clear to others the license terms of this work. The best way to do that is with a link to this web page: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/   .
     

Core Knowledge G1 Unit 04

 

The Green Fern Zoo


Welcome to the world’s most explicit / systematic phonics-learning environment ever, neurologically efficient, and designed to occur IN THE PROCESS of reading (not via ineffective activities that occur offline from actually reading), and by reading high-interest, broad, deep content, which by 4th grade becomes primarily 100% Core Knowledge content.

To start, let’s focus on only simple CVC, CVCC, and CCVC (and similar 2/3-letter words) in this first red-word array. This will help the brain learn into single consonants and the 5 short vowels. Note that there is no change in any of these letters’ appearances when the red words are activated in pop-up boxes, because in PQs, these are English’s most frequent sounds, and we don’t alter the appearance of letters for these most COMMON sounds:

   
    
Meet Vern
  
My name is Vern, and I have the best job! My job is to take you kids in to see the Green Fern Zoo.
   
We will see things with wings, and things with scales, things that bite, and things that sting, things that creep, and things that swim.
  
I have lots of fun facts and tales to share with you. So let’s see the zoo and have some fun!
 
 
    

Now, let’s try something unique. Let’s actually repurpose the very same above content, but let’s focus the brain on a DIFFERENT set of letter-sound matches, the letter-name sounds. You’ll experience two types of PQ visual alterations here. Letter-name letters will become big and thick. Silent letters will turn light gray. 
 
    
Meet Vern
  
My name is Vern, and I have the best job! My job is to take you kids in to see the Green Fern Zoo.
   
We will see things with wings, and things with scales, things that bite, and things that sting, things that creep, and things that swim.
  
I have lots of fun facts and tales to share with you. So let’s see the zoo and have some fun!
    
 
   
We could just introduce different letter-sound matches, in any order of scaffolding, as we progressed through the passage (and not do any “repurposing”). But an appropriate amount of repetition certainly won’t hurt. One more time with the above content, this time focusing on letter-sound types that PQs underlines. Two-letter combinations that make one single sound (TH, SH, CH, PH, etc.) are fully-underlined. “Blends” that retain some of their letters’ more expected sounds are DOTTED-underlined. 
 
    
Meet Vern
  
My name is Vern, and I have the best job! My job is to take you kids in to see the Green Fern Zoo.
   
We will see things with wings, and things with scales, things that bite, and things that sting, things that creep, and things that swim.
  
I have lots of fun facts and tales to share with you. So let’s see the zoo and have some fun!
       
   
   
For the remainder of this brief demonstration, let’s see some of the other visual clues that a student will encounter. Letters move off of the line, like in “kids” and “things” below. The floating S reinforces that S is actually making a Z sound. Check another sound. The first O in “boot” is a different sound than the first O in “book.” See how the O floats or drops, depending on which of those two sounds it makes in “room, cool, and look.” The letter U has the same two sound possibilities (among others), and its visuals mimic the same PQ behavior as the O examples. Check out the word “would,” where the U drops. In the word “of,” the F sounds like a V. Notice that it floats. And in the word “they,” the E makes a Letter-name-A sound, so it drops. Finally, there are some stretched-letter examples. Note that A is stretched when it makes its “aw” sound, as in “because” and “all” below. U is stretched when it makes its W sound, as in “squid” below. These are just some of the visual PQ aids that reinforce the sound-outs of each letter. These do NOT need to taught ahead of time. The sound-out is the more critical aid, and our perspective is that the visual aids will subconsciously be learned without offline effort to memorize them.

   
   
Things That Swim
   
I hope you kids like things that swim, because this is the room where we keep all the fish.
   
The fish here are trout. A trout is a fish that swims in cool lakes and creeks. You can see that they have lots of spots and marks. The spots and marks help the trout hide. They make the trout look a lot like the sand on the bed of a creek.
   
Here’s a big fish that makes all of the wee fish run and hide. This is a reef shark. It has that name because it likes to make its home close to a reef, where there are lots of fish.
   
You can see that the reef shark has fins and a set of gills on its side. You can not see them from here, but this shark has lots of sharp teeth in its mouth.
   
Would a reef shark bite you? Well, you are not the lunch that this shark would like best. A reef shark likes to feed on squid, crabs, and shrimp. But it would be smart not to get the reef shark mad at you, all the same!
 



We hope that you have found the above demonstration highly intriguing. We will have the most comprehensive and thorough phonics-learning environment ever created. First, we will enjoy the massive vocabulary that has been incorporated into Core Knowledge. Any letter-sound combination that we want to find will exist in their reading content. Further, we are working with an over 200,000-word database, discovering English quirks that most people never imagined existed. Finally, we are augmenting Core Knowledge content in certain areas to “guarantee” “right-time gap-filling” on very key words in English, such as Dolch, Fry, Coxhead academic, exposure to all Greek and Latin roots, most-frequent words encountered from the world’s best word corpuses, etc. And all of this in the process of reading rich, varied content
    
AND WE ARE FREE.
      
AnyOneCanRead (TM): all the English Literacy “necessaries” and “sufficients” bundled together in one single place. Easy to use. Pretty much, “just read.” An environment that finally matches what the Reading Science identifies in the “great reader’s brain.” An interactive, multi-sensory environment to build decoding mastery (RECOGNITION). And the world’s best curriculum, by-far, to build KNOWLEDGE that results in a 130,000-word vocabulary (UNDERSTANDING). It’s finally time to end Illiteracy and to break the devastating cycle of poverty in America.
  
AnyOneCanRead (TM).
   
  
This link provides some more examples below of what is being built inside the AnyOneCanRead (TM) K-12 Ivy League-ready curriculum. These examples are in the early-elementary space. Again, please do not forward this link without prior permission. Thank you!
   
   
   
Reading Session 00001 – Core Knowledge K Unit 04
   

This work is based on an original work of the Core Knowledge ® Foundation made available through licensing under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. This does not in any way imply that the Core Knowledge Foundation endorses this work. With the understanding that for reuse or distribution, you must make clear to others the license terms of this work. The best way to do that is with a link to this web page: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/   .

  
To Learning Stewards
NEW WORDS LEARNED (16) : and, cat, dad, dog, fog, fun, hog, in, mat, mom, on, pen, pet, pig, van, vet
  
GRADE-ISH: 0.1 (very early Kindergarten)
  
   
Pet Fun
 
Pet cat.
 
Pet dog.
 
Pet pig.
 
Pet hog.
 
Cat on mat.

Cat in fog.
 
Cat on mom.

Cat on dog.
 
Dog and vet.
 
Dad and vet.
 
Dad in van.
 
Dog in van.
 
Pig in pen.
 
Hog in pen.
 
Pig on hog.
 
Hog on pig.
 
  
  
   
00002 – Core Knowledge K Unit 05
   
This work is based on an original work of the Core Knowledge ® Foundation made available through licensing under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. This does not in any way imply that the Core Knowledge Foundation endorses this work. With the understanding that for reuse or distribution, you must make clear to others the license terms of this work. The best way to do that is with a link to this web page: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/   .
   
To Learning Stewards:
NEW WORDS LEARNED (13) : Jin, Kim, Min, at, but, fed, had, him, led, man, ox, ran, sat
   
GRADE-ISH: 0.1 (very early Kindergarten)
  
  
Ox And Man
    
Ox ran and ran.
   
Jin ran at him,
   
But Ox ran on.
   
Kim had him,
   
But Ox ran on.
   
Min fed Ox,
   
And led him,
   
And sat on him.
 
   
   
     
00003 – Pattern-Builder Poems 0001
  
To Learning Stewards:
NEW WORDS LEARNED (21) : I, can, day, gray, have, here, it’s, may, not, out, play, rain’s, say, see, stay, the, this, to, way, we, you

GRADE-ISH: 0.2 (very early Kindergarten) 

 
May Day
  
“On this May day,
  
Can we stay,
   
Out here to play?”
   
“I have to say,
  
Not this day.
   
You see.
  
It’s gray.
  
Rain’s on the way!”
 
   
   
   
00004 – Pattern-Builder Poems 0002

To Learning Stewards:
NEW WORDS LEARNED (21) : be, black, can’t, could, hair, he, he’s, is, let, me, mine, no, red, so, who’s

GRADE-ISH: 0.2 (very early Kindergarten)
   
   
   
Is He Me?
  
Who’s he?
  
Is he me?
  
Could he be?
  
No, not me.
  
His hair is black.
  
Mine is red.
  
Can’t you see?
  
He’s not me.
   
So let me be!
 
 
   
      

00005 – Pattern-Builder Poems 0003

To Learning Stewards:
NEW WORDS LEARNED (17) : fa, great, ha, jokes, la, love, ma, ma’s, much, my, pa, pa’s, pop, tell, they, they’re, tra

GRADE-ISH:  0.2 (very early Kindergarten)
   
   
   
Ma And Pa
  
Fa, la, la!
  
I love my ma.
  
I love my pa.
   
La, la, la!
  
I love my mom.
  
I love my pop.
  
Tra, la, la.
  
My pa’s my dad,
  
My ma’s my mom,
  
They’re so much fun!
  
They tell great jokes!
  
Ha! Ha!
  
Ha! Ha!
 
   
   
    

00006 – Poems And Rhymes 0001

To Learning Stewards:
NEW WORDS LEARNED (20) : a, all, bad, good, head, horse, it, lay, luck, pick, pin, pins, shall, should, tail, up, what, where, with, you’ll

GRADE-ISH: 0.3 (early kindergarten)
   
   
   
See! See!
  
See! See!
  
What shall I see?
  
A horse,
  
With his head,
  
Where his tail,
  
Should be!
 
   
  
   
Pins
  
See a pin,
  
And pick it up,

All the day,

You’ll have good luck.

See a pin,

And let it lay,

Bad luck you’ll have,

All the day.
 
  
  
NOW SKIPPING FORWARD TO A COUPLE OF LATE-K SESSIONS …
   
  
Poems And Rhymes A108

To Learning Stewards
NEW WORDS LEARNED (18) board, brave, drop, ducks, knew, lake, rest, roam, ruled, seas, steer, thin, through, tossed, wheels, would, zag, zig

GRADE-ISH: 0.9 (exiting Kindergarten)
   
   
   
The Wheels On The Bus
  
The wheels on the bus,
  
Go ’round and ’round,
  
‘Round and ’round,
  
‘Round and ’round.
  
The wheels on the bus,
  
Go ’round and ’round,
  
All through the town.
 
 
  
   
Moon Boat
  
Moon boat, so small,
  
Brave and bright,
  
Tossed all through,
  
The seas at night,
  
One day when,
  
I’m free to roam,
  
I’ll climb on board,
  
And steer you home.
 
   
   
   
Five Wee Ducks
   
Five wee ducks,
   
That I once knew,
   
Fat ones,
   
Thin ones,
  
Tall ones, too.
   
But the one wee duck,
   
With a drop on his back,
  
He ruled the rest,
  
With a “Quack! Quack! Quack!”
  
“Quack! Quack! Quack!”
   
“Quack! Quack! Quack!”
   
He ruled the rest,
   
With a “Quack! Quack! Quack!”
   
Down to the lake,
  
They all would go.
  
Zig-zag,
  
Zig-zag,
  
Don’t you know.
   
But the one wee duck,
  
With a drop on his back,
   
He ruled the rest,
  
With a “Quack! Quack! Quack!”
   
“Quack! Quack! Quack!”
   
“Quack! Quack! Quack!”
  
He ruled the rest,
  
With a “Quack! Quack! Quack!”
 
    
   
     

Pattern-Builder Poems 0007

To Learning Stewards
NEW WORDS LEARNED (37): bark, bow, bunch, cheer, chores, chow, cow, field, fire, flow, glow, grow, idea, job, lawn, let’s, low, meow, milk, mow, ow, plow, pow, row, scare, scream, seeds, show, slow, snow, sow, tow, whew, window, wow, yellow, yes

GRADE-ISH: 0.9 (exiting Kindergarten)  
   
    
   
Chores
   
Yes, I know.
  
This is a lot of work.
  
Just go with the flow.
  
Mow the lawn.
  
Sow the seeds.
  
Let them grow.
  
Tow the car.
  
Row the boat.
  
Scare off that crow.
  
It’s on the window.
  
Tie a bow.

See how low,
     
You can go.
  
Good job, WOW!
  
Let’s cheer, “MEOW!”
  
Let’s bark, “BOW – WOW!”
  
Plow the field.
  
Milk the cow.
  
Do it now.
  
What went “POW?”
  
Did you scream, “OW?”
  
Is there a fire?
  
I see a red glow!
  
I see bright yellow!

Blow it out!
  
Don’t go slow!
  
Good idea!
  
Throw a bunch of wet snow!
  
You put on a great show!
  
And you put out the fire!
  
WHEW!
   
Your work is done.
   
Come on in for some chow!
 
     
  
SKIPPING FORWARD TO A COUPLE OF MID-1ST GRADE SESSIONS:
  
   
Core Knowledge K Unit 09

This work is based on an original work of the Core Knowledge ® Foundation made available through licensing under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. This does not in any way imply that the Core Knowledge Foundation endorses this work. With the understanding that for reuse or distribution, you must make clear to others the license terms of this work. The best way to do that is with a link to this web page: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/   .


GRADE-ISH: 1.4 (middle 1st grade)  


Zack And Ann
 
     
PART ONE:

To Learning Stewards
NEW WORDS LEARNED (22) Chang, Gwen’s, Zack, Zack’s, bits, blocks, cab, crab, dress, kicks, kids, lifts, missing, rips, sand, shop, snaps, sped, spots, thump, trash, words
      
    
The Bad Crab
  
This is Zack Chang.
  
Zack is six.
  
This is Ann Chang.
  
Ann is ten.
  
Zack and Ann sit in the sun.
  
Mom and Dad sit with them.
  
Zack spots a crab on the sand.
 
The crab runs up.
  
Then it snaps at Zack’s leg.
  
Zack jumps up on the bench.
  
The bad crab snaps at Dad.
  
Dad lifts up his legs.
  
The bad crab snaps at Mom.
  
Mom kicks sand at the crab.
  
The bad crab runs off.
  
Ann jumps up and yells at the kids on the next bench, “Bad crab on the sand! Pass the word!”
  
The kids on the next bench spot the crab and jump up.
  
The bad crab snaps at them.
  
Then it runs past them.
  
When it is past them, the kids yell, “Bad crab on the sand! Pass the word!”
 
  
  
Ann’s Dress
  
Ann went to Gwen’s Dress Shop.
  
The shop had a red dress.
  
Ann got the dress.
  
Ann got in a cab with the dress.
   
The cab man sped off.
  
His cab went fast.
  
Then the cab hit a big bump. Thump!
  
Ann’s dress fell from the cab.
  
Ann had the cab man stop the cab.
  
Then Ann ran back to get the dress.
  
Ann had to run ten blocks.
   
Ann’s dress was in a trash can.
  
A bus had hit it.
  
A dog bit it.
  
The dress had mud on it.
  
The dress had rips and missing bits.
  
Ann’s dress was a mess!
 
  
  
  
PART TWO:
   
To Learning Stewards
NEW WORDS LEARNED (28) Dan’s, Ed, Nell, Quinn, adds, asks, bangs, block, bucks, cash, costs, crack, deck, dents, drills, dust, fix, mask, mast, nods, rubs, rust, sands, scrubs, shrugs, smack, tells, tip
    
    
Zack Gets a Pet
  
“Can I get a cat?” Zack asks.
   
Dad tells Zack, “No cats! Cats run up trees and can’t get back.”
  
“Can I get a rat?” Zack asks.
  
Mom adds, “No, no! No rats. Rats smell bad.”
  
“Can I get a bug?” Zack asks.
   
Ann tells Zack, “No, no! A bug is not a pet!”
  
Can I get a fish?” Zack asks.
  
“A fish?” his mom asks.
  
“A fish is not so bad. Can a fish be a fun pet?”
  
Dad nods and Ann shrugs.
   
“Can I get one, then?” Zack asks.
  
Mom nods.
  
“Yes!” yells Zack.
  
Zack runs to the pet shop.
  
“Can I get that fish?” Zack asks.
  
“This one?” the pet shop man asks.
  
Zack nods.
  
“This one costs six bucks.”
  
Zack hands the man the cash.
  
Then Zack runs to Mom and Dad with his pet fish.
 
  
     
On the Mat
  
Zack and Ann had fun on a mat.
   
Zack got on the mat.
  
Then Ann got on next to Zack.
  
Then Quinn got on next to Ann.
  
Nell got up on top of Zack and Ann.
  
Rod got up on top of Ann and Quinn.
   
Then Ed got up on the tip top.
   
It was so much fun!
   
Then, buzz, buzz!
  
What was that?
   
It was a bug.
  
The bug was on Zack’s chin.
  
Zack went to smack the bug.
   
Flop!
   
Zack fell flat on the mat.
   
Nell fell on top of Zack.
   
Then all the rest of the kids fell.
  
It was a big mess.
 
   
   
Fix That Ship
  
Zack’s dad, Dan, has a ship.
  
It’s fun to fish on the ship.
   
But Dan can’t fish on the ship yet.
  
Dan must fix up his ship.
  
The ship has a big crack in its mast.
  
It has dents, which Dan must fix.
  
It has rust, which Dan must sand.
  
Dan gets the ship up on the land.
  
Then Dan gets a mask.
  
The mask will help block the dust.
  
Dan sands the deck.
   
Dan rubs and scrubs.
   
Dan drills and bangs.
  
At last, Dan’s ship is all set.
 
   
   
   
PART THREE:
 
To Learning Stewards
NEW WORDS LEARNED (16) drip, gift, hum, lid, munch, net, quick, quips, ruff, slick, slid, slug, swings, swish, tent, truck
  
      
The Tent
  
Once, Zack’s dad got the kids a tent.
    
Zack and Ann set up the tent.
  
Then the kids sang a song:
  
“This big tent, it is the best, is the best, is the best! This big tent, it is the best. Yes, it’s the best!”
   
The kids had fun in the tent.
   
But then a big wind hit the tent.
   
Flop!
   
The tent fell on Zack and Ann.
   
Then Zack felt a drip.
   
Drip, drop, drip, drop.
   
Splish, splash, splish, splash.
   
Zack and Ann got wet.
   
The kids set the tent back up.
    
Red ants got in and bit Zack.
   
A slug got on Ann.
   
Once the ants and slug got in, that was it.
   
Zack and Ann ran from the tent.
 
   
    
A Gift From Mom
  
Once, Mom got the kids a gift.
   
The gift was in a big black box.
  
Mom set the box on the rug.
   
“Is it a truck?” Zack said.
  
“No,” Mom said. “It’s not a truck.”
   
“I bet it’s a hat,” Ann said.
   
“No,” Mom said. “It’s not a hat.”
   
Then the box said, “Ruff, ruff!”
   
Zack slid the lid off the box.
   
A dog sat up.
   
“It’s a dog!” said Ann.
   
“Yes!” said Zack. “Mom’s the best!”
 
   
      
Bug and Frog
   
Zack and Ann sit next to the pond.
   
Zack says, “The pond is a lot of fun! I wish I were a bug.”
   
Why?” says Ann. “Bugs are no fun.”
   
“Bugs zip and hum” says Zack.
   
“Frogs hop and splash and munch on bugs,” says Ann.
   
“I will not wish I was a bug.” Zack quips.
   
Zack and Ann had fun at the pond.
   
They will tell Mom and Dad.
 
   
   
Swing That Net
   
Zack is at the pond.
   
There are lots of frogs in the pond.
   
Zack runs in to get one.
   
But the frogs are so quick!
   
The frogs are so slick!
   
When Zack runs in, the frogs hop off.
   
Zack gets a net and runs in.
   
The frogs all jump.
   
Zack swings his net and yells, “Get in here, frogs!”
  
Swish!
   
Zack gets a frog in his net!
   
Zack yells and swings the net.
   
Swish, swish, swish!
   
Swish, swish, swish!
  
Zack gets lots of frogs.
   
There are six big ones in his net!
 
   
   
   
PART FOUR:
 
To Learning Stewards
NEW WORDS LEARNED (20): Spot’s, band, bath, bathtub, bun, casts, club, ding, flips, golf, grill, grips, pals, pans, pots, sets, shelf, snacks, thwack, tub
   
Spot’s Bath
    
Spot is in his bathtub.
   
Spot and his dog pals went in a mud pit.
   
The kids must get the mud off.
   
Spot is one sad dog.
   
His dog pals are still in the mud pit.
    
But Spot is stuck in the tub.
   
Zack grips Spot with his hands.
   
Then his hands slip.
   
Spot runs off.
   
The kids run to the mud pit.
   
There’s Spot, back in the mud with the rest of his dog pals.
   
“Spot!” Zack yells. “Bad dog!”
   
“Spot!” Ann yells. “Get back in that tub!”
 
 
   
The Pots and Pans Band
   
Zack and Ann are in a band.
   
It’s a pots and pans band.
   
Zack and Quinn bang on pots.
  
Ann and Nell bang on pans.
   
Bang, bang! Ding, ding!
   
Mom wants to sing songs.
   
“Stop!” Mom says.
   
Mom asks the band to sing, not bang.
   
Mom sets up snacks and says, “Snacks!”
   
The kids drop the pots and pans and run to get the snacks.
  
Mom grabs the pots and pans and sets them on a shelf.
   
And that is the end of the pots and pans band!
 
   
   
When It’s Hot
   
When it’s hot, it’s fun to golf.
   
Zack’s dad swings his golf club. Thwack!
  
Zack runs up the hill.
   
“Where did it land?” his dad asks.
   
“It’s up here!” Zack yells back.
   
When it’s hot, it’s fun to fish.
   
Zack sits on a rock and casts.
   
His dad sits next to him.
   
“Where are all the fish?” Zack asks.
   
“I can’t tell,” says his dad, “but it’s fun just to sit in the sun.”
   
When it’s hot, it’s fun to grill.
   
Zack’s dad gets the hot dogs.
   
Zack gets the buns.
   
Zack’s dad flips the hot dogs.
   
Zack sets a hot dog on a bun.
   
Yum, yum!
 
  
  
  
PART FIVE:
   
To Learning Stewards
NEW WORDS LEARNED (20) brush, dent, gas, gash, hug, kiss, pad, rush, scrub, shrubs, step, steps, sting, stings, tasks, tenth, trim, trims, ug, zips
 
   
Ann’s Hat Box
   
Ann sets a box of hats on the bed.
   
“Which hat is the best?” Ann asks. “Is this black top hat the best?”
   
No!” Zack says. “That one has a big dent!”
   
“Is this one the best?” asks Ann.
   
“No,” says Zack. “That’s a nap cap!”
   
“Is this one the best?” asks Ann.
   
“No,” says Zack.
   
“This one?” Ann asks.
  
“Yuck!” says Zack.
  
Ann picks lots of hats.
  
Zack says no to all of them.
  
Then Ann picks a red hat.
   
“Is this one the best?” Ann asks.
  
Yes!” Zack says.
   
“That red hat is the best!”
 
    
    
   
Dan the Cab Man
   
Zack’s dad, Dan, has a cab.
   
A man jumps in the cab. “Where to?” Dan asks.
   
Tenth and Hill,” says the man. “And step on it!” the man adds. “I’m in a big rush!”
   
Dan nods and steps on the gas.
   
Dan zips past a van.
   
Dan zips past a bus.
  
In a flash, the cab is there.
   
This is the spot!” says Dan.
   
The man grabs a bunch of cash and hands it to Dan.
 
   
   
    
Help from Pals
   
Ann has a lot of tasks.
  
“Cut the grass!” says Dad.
  
“Scrub the pots!” says Mom.
   
“Trim the shrubs,” says Dad.
  
Brush the dog!” says Mom.
   
“Ug!” says Ann.
  
What a lot of tasks!
   
Ann asks Zack to help with the tasks.
  
Zack runs and gets Rod and Ed.
  
Ann cuts the grass.
  
Zack and Ed scrub the pots.
  
Ann trims the shrubs.
  
Rod scrubs the dog.
   
Then there are no tasks left!
 
   
   
    
Ann’s Cut
  
Ann has a cut on one leg.
  
It’s not just a cut. It’s a red gash.
  
“Mom!” Ann yells. “Dad!”
  
Mom and Dad run up.
  
Mom gets a pad to scrub the cut.
  
“No!” yells Ann. “That will sting!”
  
“It will sting.” says Dad, “but it will help.”
  
Mom rubs the cut with the pad.
   
“It stings! It stings!” yells Ann.
  
“There!” Mom says. “All set!”
  
Ann gets a kiss from Dad, and a big hug from Mom.
 
   
   
   
Part of a Beatrix Potter rewrite (leveled for lower-grade independent reading, Grade-ISH 1.7):
   
  PART THREE, from “Two Bad Mice” (originally titled “The Tale Of Two Bad Mice”)
   
Now the mice were out of their minds. Each one’s face was red. Sweat came down their heads. Their eyes popped out. Their paws were bunched like fists. They screamed. They yelled. They cursed. It was not a nice scene!
   
They said, “Let’s mess this place up!” They tried to break each thing that they could! Like Jane’s clothes. They threw them on the floor. They ripped them. They tore them.
   
Then they stole things. Things they could use in their mouse-hole. Forks. Spoons. Knives. Some of the clothes. They took a chair. A small bed. Some small odds and ends.
   
They tried to take a book case. Too big. It would not fit. They tried a bird cage. Same thing. Too big. It would not fit. They left those two things on the rug, by the coal box.
   
Then they heard a noise. It was Liz and Jane. They were back. Tom and Pam rushed to their mouse-hole.
   
Liz talked to Jane. Jane talked to Liz. They came to their doll’s house. They went in the front door. Then up the stairs. And, oh my! What a mess they saw. A HUGE mess. They stopped and stared. They did not make a sound. Jane leaned on the wall. Liz sat down.
   
They found the bird cage. They brought it back in. Then they got the book case. That was brought in, too. There were still some pots and pans.
   
Now, a REAL girl owned the doll’s house. She saw the mess, too. She cried and cried. “Mom, I need a new doll, dressed like a cop!”
   
Mom said to her, “I don’t think so. That won’t scare them off. It was mice who did this. I’ll set a mouse trap!”
   
So, that ends our tale of the two bad mice.
   
Well, not quite. There’s a wee bit more. You’ll like this!
   
The mice were not as bad as you think. Tom paid for each thing they broke! You see, he found coins. They were in the wall. They were worth a lot. He gave them to Liz and Jane. He brought them to the doll’s house on New Year’s Eve! That was nice of him!
   
And guess what? Pam helps them, too. Each day, she sneaks in. She has a broom. She sweeps the floors. She puts the dust in a dust pan. She dumps it in the fire-place.
   
There is not a doll’s house in the world that is as clean as this one! It’s nice to know these mice have some good in their hearts!
  
   
    
Here is an example of a “Fast Break,” with just a few sentences from this reading session, designed to “close out” knowledge of all the “Fry words” that haven’t been learned, up to now, in the curriculum (red words are Fry words):   
   
GRADE-ISH: 2.4 (middle 2nd grade) 
   
Have you had an electric shock?
  
Our experiment did not work.
  
It was an exciting show.
  
She took a trip to France.
  
His father was a French General.
  
Wash that glass.
  
Will you work for the government?
    
I love Greek food.
  

 etc … 
   
This is a snippet from an early 4th-grade Core Knowledge passage. We will utilize Core Knowledge in a unique way. The READ-TOS that occur in K through 3 will be repurposed as slightly-leveled-down (mostly breaking long compound sentences into shorter, separate sentences) INDEPENDENT reading in 4th grade and up. This will highly augment the available INDEPENDENT reading in this curriculum.

Exploring And Moving To America
This work is based on an original work of the Core Knowledge ® Foundation made available through licensing under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. This does not in any way imply that the Core Knowledge Foundation endorses this work. With the understanding that for reuse or distribution, you must make clear to others the license terms of this work. The best way to do that is with a link to this web page: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/   .

GRADE-ISH: 4.0 (entering 4th grade)


PART ONE:
   
CHAPTER ONE: Christopher Columbus: A Young Adventurer
   
Let’s meet Christopher Columbus when he was a boy. He lived in the city of Genoa. That’s in Italy. He loved the sea. He had a younger brother. They spent lots of time at the dock. They watched ships sail in and out. They watched the sailors hard at work. They would unload huge boxes. They were filled with silk cloth and spices. The brothers dreamed of being sailors, too!
   
Christopher turned fourteen. He got a job on a ship. He carried messages from the captain to the sailors. One year later, he was hired as a ship’s helper. He soon got a bigger job. He became a sailor! His dream of adventure at sea was coming true. During that time, his brother had learned to make maps. Together, they hoped to sail far away.
   
Back then, people didn’t know about all the continents and oceans. Some thought that the Earth was flat. They worried about a ship sailing too far across the ocean. They thought the ship would fall off the edge! But others believed that Earth was round. Columbus was one of those people.
   
Why did people want to go on long voyages then? The main reason was that people wanted to trade. They wanted to buy and sell such things as spices and silk. Those things could not be found in Europe. And trade could also make people rich!
 
   
     
CHAPTER TWO: Christopher Has An Idea
   
In Columbus’s time, there were no refrigerators. So, it was hard to keep food fresh. Europeans often ate food, especially meat, that was NOT fresh. People used spices to help make that food taste better. Cloves, pepper, cinnamon, and nutmeg all helped to do this.
   
Many of these spices could only be found in a faraway part of the world. This region was called “the Indies.” Today, that’s Asia. A voyage to the Indies and back was long and dangerous. You had to sail part of the way across water. Then, some people had to carry goods on camels. This would be across hot deserts. Many times, they were robbed. Or they might get lost. Or they might run out of water.
   
Christopher had an idea. What if the Earth was round? Maybe he could sail west around the world! Maybe he could reach the Indies that way. It might be a shorter trip than heading east. The whole trip could be made by ship. They’d sail across the Atlantic Ocean. There’d be no need to go across hot, dry deserts. Plus, many more spices and other goods could be carried on ships than on camels.
   
Today, we know what happens if you sail west across the Atlantic Ocean from Europe. You reach North and South America. But Christopher didn’t know this. Then, many people thought there was nothing but ocean if you sailed west.
       
 
     
One final sample … just wanted to show some content that was at a much higher grade level, now at middle 6th grade.   
   
    
Core Knowledge G2 H&G Unit 02
  
This work is based on an original work of the Core Knowledge ® Foundation made available through licensing under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. This does not in any way imply that the Core Knowledge Foundation endorses this work. With the understanding that for reuse or distribution, you must make clear to others the license terms of this work. The best way to do that is with a link to this web page: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/   .  
  
GRADE-ISH: 6.6 (middle 6th grade) 

Ancient China

Chapter Six: Chinese Inventions
   
Look at your book. What is it made of? It’s made of paper. Think about all the times today you have seen or used something made of paper. A long time ago, in ancient China, people learned to make paper. They were the first people to do so, and they were the first to make and use paper money.
   
Early paper was made by mashing up rags, old rope, the bark of trees, and water. This mixture was then flattened and dried. Paper became easy and cheap to make, and many things could be made from paper!
   
Imagine that every book in the world had to be made by hand, with someone writing every word on every page. For a long time, even for hundreds of years after the invention of paper, books were actually made this way.
   
Then, in ancient China, people came up with an easier way to make books. They developed an early form of printing. They made small blocks of wood and carved, or cut, a character on each block. They put the small blocks together. Then they put ink on the blocks. When paper was pressed on the blocks, a page of printed words appeared in seconds. The blocks could be put together in different ways to make other pages.
   
In America, fireworks light up the night sky on the Fourth of July each year. But did you know that fireworks were actually invented in ancient China? One day, a very long time ago in ancient China, an experiment went wrong. As a result, a gray powder, called gunpowder, was invented. Gunpowder exploded when lit. People began to add ingredients to the gunpowder so that the explosions would be colorful. Today we call these explosions fireworks!
   
Many hundreds of years ago, the Chinese learned how to make porcelain. Porcelain is made from special white clay instead of the usual brown clay. Clay is a sticky, muddy substance that comes from the earth and is used to make pots, cups, plates, and other things. The Chinese used porcelain to make beautiful, delicate dishes. These dishes were nicer and more valuable than the ones made from brown clay. Porcelain is often called china in English. Can you guess why?
 
   
   
Chapter Seven: Beautiful Silk
   
An old folktale tells us that thousands of years ago, a queen named Si Ling-chi was sitting in the garden of her royal palace. The queen was drinking tea and watching little caterpillars spin, or make their cocoons, in some mulberry trees. Suddenly one of the cocoons fell into her teacup!
   
Si Ling-chi watched the cocoon floating in her tea. She saw that a tiny thread had come loose from the cocoon. She pulled on it and was amazed to find that the cocoon was made from one very long thread. This was a silk thread. As the story goes, Queen Si Ling-chi learned to spin silk thread, which she used to make beautiful cloth.
   
The making of silk became a closely guarded secret. In fact, in China, you could be killed if you ever told a foreigner the secret of how silk was made. The reason for this was that silk could make people a lot of money. The Chinese wanted to be able to sell their silk to foreigners. Beautiful silk robes were made for the rich and powerful, including the rulers of China. Chinese rulers often wore the color yellow.
   
So many people went to China to buy silk that the main road from Europe to China became known as the “Silk Road.” There were many dangers on the Silk Road, including bandits and miles of hot, dry desert. But silk was so desired that people were willing to travel a long way to get it.
   
You may be wondering exactly how silk is made. Well, some of what’s involved in making it is the same now as it was thousands of years ago. To begin with, you need silkworms. Silkworms are fussy. They must have mulberry leaves to eat. After munching on mulberry leaves for about forty-five days, the silkworms spin their cocoons. They spend three or four days making a single thread. When the cocoons are ready, silk makers put the cocoons in steam or hot water to loosen the ends of the thread. The thread from just one cocoon might be three thousand feet long — more than half a mile! The thread is used to make many things, including beautiful silk cloth.